Whirld Works Homemade Honey Vanilla Ice Cream


Honey Vanilla Ice CreamFew treats are as refreshing as a cold cup of homemade ice cream on a hot homestead afternoon. Ice cream is a very rare reward here at Whirl’d Works farm, but it is certainly a hit with the entire family. If you are taken to read the ingredient labels on the things you buy at the store like we are, ice cream is one of those many things we typically steer clear of. There are a few that have simple, easy to read and understand ingredients, but most of them require a degree in chemistry to understand what is in them. We try to limit the amount of sugar that we consume as a family, but recently discovered an ice cream recipe that uses honey instead of processed sugar (and don’t get us started on the high fructose corn syrup!).

We do have a small ice cream maker in the house, but it doesn’t get used much (definitely not often enough).  In fact, several of our attempts with different methods and recipes resulted in dismal and frustrating failures. Intrigued by this rather simple recipe, we set out to give it a try. There isn’t a taste bud in this house that hasn’t jumped for joy at the end product this time!

Before you begin, it is important to understand that the best result comes with patience. Trying to hurry this process along may not bring you the results you desire. Don’t expect to whip this dessert up in an hour, but instead, prepare yourself to expect about a full day to experience this sweet treat in all it’s magnificence.

Ingredients (Makes about 1 quart)

  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Combine the cream, milk, honey in a heavy saucepan.
  2. Lightly whisk the egg yolks in a medium sized metal or glass bowl.
  3. Place the saucepan over low to medium heat and stir continuously until the mixture is hot (be careful not to let the milk boil or scorch).
  4. Once the cream is hot, slowly pour 1 cup of the cream into the egg yolks and whisk together.
  5. Pour this yolk mixture into the saucepan of cream and continue to heat, stirring continuously until the mixture thickens slightly (it will be the right consistency when the cream coats the back of a wooden spoon).
  6. Stir in the vanilla extract.
  7. Pour the heated custard into a heat resistant container and cover.
  8. Refrigerate until cold, about 6 hours. (To speed up the cooling process, place your sealed container into a  larger bowl full of cold water and ice). Your ice cream maker will be more efficient the colder the custard is.
  9. Pour the chilled custard into your ice cream maker and follow the manufacturers directions. (We use a Deni Ice Cream Maker that requires you to freeze the canister at least a day in advance of making your ice cream).
  10. When the mixture is properly frozen, place it into a freezer-safe container and place this into your freezer for at least two hours.
  11. Top with cinnamon, nutmeg or your favorite topping and enjoy! Deni Ice Cream Maker

 

 

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